The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Sixteen – Vocabulary

The vocabulary word for The Prince and the Pauper Chapter 16 is used very frequently in the novel, as both a noun and an adjective. These folks were essential to the hierarchical structure of Tudor England, even if they may have been the cause drama often times. Today our vocab word for Chapter 16 is…

NOBLE

Keep reading or watch the video below see how the word ‘noble’ is used in The Prince and the Pauper.

noble

DEFINITION

(adj) belonging to a high social class
FACTS/CHARACTERISTICS

Also can be used to describe someone with high moral principles
EXAMPLES

aristocratic
titled
honorable
NON-EXAMPLES

humble
dishonorable
plebian

Etymology

  • Language of Origin: Old French
  • “noble” meaning of noble bearing or birth

  • Language of Origin: Latin
  • “nobillis” meaning well-known, famous, renowned; excellent, superior, splendid; high-born, of superior birth

Sentences/Additional Forms

  • Straightforward sentence: The soldier will always be remembered for being a brave and noble man.
  • Sentence from the chapter: “‘…at last come two nobles, richly clothed…who…approach and rub the table with bread and salt…” (p. 97)
  • Other forms: noble/nobles (n), nobility (n)

Noble Gases

  • Helium, Neon, Argon, Krypton, Xenon, Radon, (Oganesson)
  • They are the last column of the periodic table.
  • Oganesson is a man-made (synthetic) element that doesn’t entirely fit into the group.
  • They are called noble gases because they are so majestic that, in general, they don’t react with anything. For this reason they are also known as inert gases.
  • Come from German word ‘Edelgas’

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References

http://victorian-era.org/royal-british-nobility.html

https://www.etymonline.com/word/noble

https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/chemistry/noble-gases#:~:text=The%20noble%20gases%2C%20in%20order,also%20known%20as%20inert%20gases.

https://www.thoughtco.com/why-noble-gases-are-called-noble-608603

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