The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Thirty – Fun Fact

In Ch. 30 of The Prince and the Pauper, we see Tom finally starting to get used to his role as king. Additionally, both Edward and Tom’s family begin to fade from his mind. In The Prince and the Pauper Chapter 30 Fun Fact focuses on…

LOSING CHILDHOOD MEMORIES

Keep reading or watch the video below for more information.

Reference in The Prince and the Pauper

“Tom’s poor mother and sisters travelled the same road out of his mind. At first he pined for them, sorrowed for them, longed to see them, but later, the thought of their coming some day in their rags and dirt, and betraying him with their kisses, and pulling him down from his lofty place, and dragging him back to penury and degradation and the slums, made him shudder. At last they ceased to trouble his thoughts almost wholly. And he was content, even glad: for, whenever their mournful and accusing faces did rise before him now, they made him feel more despicable than the worms that crawl.” (p. 178-179)

Why do we lose our childhood memories?

  • Repressed Memory Theory
    • Sigmund Freud
    • Repressed memories associated with childhood trauma
    • Usually doesn’t entirely erase memories; survivors tend to remember events partially
  • Memories Lack Emotional Significance
    • Memories with strong emotions are stronger
    • Young children don’t have a fully developed range of emotions
  • Normal Cognitive Development
    • New neurons form in the hippocampus as we grow
    • As new pathways are being formed, these may block off early memories
    • Older neural connections are also sometimes trimmed away

How can we bring some memories back?

  • Talk about the past
  • Look at photos
  • Revisit familiar areas
  • Keep learning

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References

https://www.healthline.com/health/why-cant-i-remember-my-childhood#takeaway

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2014/04/08/299189442/the-forgotten-childhood-why-early-memories-fade

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/07/why-childhood-memories-disappear/397502/

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/brain-implant-boosts-memory-first-time-ever-ncna821016

The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Thirty – Historical Tidbit

Throughout The Prince and the Pauper, we get a glimpse of what royal life is like. One of the biggest changes for Tom was getting used to all the people whose soul goal is to help you as the prince/king. We continue exploring that in the Chapter 30 Historical Tidbit…

YEOMEN OF THE GUARD

Keep reading or watch the video below to learn more.

Tom is started to get used to the royal treatment after spending so much time trapped in the palace:

“It came to be a proud pleasure to march to dinner attended by a glittering procession of officers of state and gentlemen-at-arms; insomuch, indeed, that he doubled his guard of gentlemen-at-arms, and made them a hundred.  He liked to hear the bugles sounding down the long corridors, and the distant voices responding, ‘Way for the King!’ ”  (p. 177)

Who were the Yeomen of the Guard?

  • The personal bodyguard of the king/queen of England
  • Created in 1485 by King Henry VII
  • Originally responsible for the king’s safety at home/away or on the battlefield
  • Originally, there were 50

Their Responsibilities

  • Mainly protection
  • Lined the hallways whenever the king moved from one room to another
  • Carried torches for the king
  • Advising the Officer of the Kitchen about when to prepare the king’s meals
  • Monitoring during meal times
  • Tasting the king’s food
  • Collect food/drink for the king at night
  • Stab the mattress with a dagger
  • Carrying royal coffins
  • Participate in royal coronation processions

Their Uniforms (modern-day)

  • Tudor-inspired
  • Gold-embroidered: Tudor rose, shamrock, and thistle, motto ‘Dieu et Mon Droit’ and initials of monarch
  • Red tunics
  • Red knee breeches
  • Red stockings
  • Sword
  • Long poles


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References

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Yeomen-of-the-Guard

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeomen_of_the_Guard

https://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/The-Yeomen-Of-The-Guard/

The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Thirty – Vocabulary

You can tell a lot about a person by the way they carry themselves. Then again you can also fake confidence based on how you position your body. The vocab word today revolves all around body language. The word is…

BEARING

Keep reading or watch the video below see how the word ‘bearing’ is used in The Prince and the Pauper.

BEARING

DEFINITION

(n.) a person’s way of standing or moving
FACTS/CHARACTERISTICS

also can refer to carrying or tolerating something (v)
EXAMPLES

posture
manner
demeanor
NON-EXAMPLES

voice
personality

Etymology

  • Language of Origin: Old Norse
  • bera = “carry, bring, bear, endure”

Sentences/Additional Forms

  • Straightforward sentence: I wasn’t sure if I’d be able to bear all the stress that went with planning the event.
  • Sentence from the chapter: “…his embarrassments departed, and gave place to an easy and confident bearing.” (p. 177)
  • Other forms: bear (v.)

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References

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bearing

https://www.etymonline.com/word/bear?ref=etymonline_crossreference#etymonline_v_8203

https://bettechamberlin.com/tag/posture/

The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Twenty-Nine – Fun Fact

In England, as well as many other countries, we have seen many examples of leaders who use intimidation and threats to keep their people in control. In a modern-day context, we can see examples of this in workplaces and other settings as well. Today’s Fun Fact dives into that particular style of leadership; The Prince and the Pauper Chapter 29 Fun Fact focuses on…

LEADING BY FEAR

Keep reading or watch the video below for more information.

Reference in The Prince and the Pauper

“About ten o’clock on the night of the 19th of February they stepped upon London Bridge, in the midst of a writhing, struggling jam of howling and hurrahing people, whose beer-jolly faces stood out strongly in the glare from manifold torches—and at that instant the decaying head of some former duke or other grandee tumbled down between them…the late good King is but three weeks dead and three days in his grave, and already the adornments which he took such pains to select from prominent people for his noble bridge are falling. ” (p. 176)

Characteristics of Fear-Based Leaders

  • Their identity is their only source of power
  • Don’t feel whole or healthy
  • Think everyone is a friend or an enemy
  • Desire trophies
  • Don’t want to learn anything new
  • Addicted to measurements

Reasons Fear-Based Leadership Doesn’t Work

  • It gets in the way of cognitive ability
  • It causes resentment and revenge
  • It triggers fight-or-flight
  • It disengages your team and stops teamwork
  • Stops people from speaking up

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References

https://www.thoughtfulleader.com/leading-by-fear/

https://blog.blackswanltd.com/the-edge/5-reasons-fear-based-leadership-is-ineffective

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2015/11/25/the-five-characteristics-of-fear-based-leaders/?sh=155dcc7d8a96

The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Twenty-Nine – Historical Tidbit

Today’s Historical Tidbit for Ch. 29 focuses on a gruesome part of London’s history. In order to keep the people of London in line, Henry VIII (and many other monarchs before and after him) had a strong visual threat to anyone thinking about going against the Crown. The Historical Tidbit for Chapter 29 is about…

THE HEADS ON LONDON BRIDGE

Keep reading or watch the video below to learn more.

When Miles and Edward return from Hendon Hall, they get caught up in a crowd on the London Bridge. While they are there, one of the heads on on display falls and causes chaos on the bridge.

“…and at that instant the decaying head of some former duke or other grandee tumbled down between them, striking Hendon on the elbow and then bounding off among the hurrying confusion of feet. So evanescent and unstable are men’s works in this world!—the late good King is but three weeks dead and three days in his grave, and already the adornments which he took such pains to select from prominent people for his noble bridge are falling.”  (p. 176)

Why were there heads on the London Bridge?

  • On the southern side of London Bridge
  • For 300 years heads were put on spikes
  • They were parboiled and covered in tar
  • Served as a warning to anyone wanting to challenge the Crown
  • They would rot and eventually fall into the river

Famous Heads

  • William Wallace – the first head in 1305
    • Put there by Edward I
  • Jack Cade – led a rebel army
  • Thomas Moore – refused to accept Henry VIII as the head of the Church of England
  • Thomas Cromwell – killed by Henry VIII for treason

Other Facts

  • It was someone’s job to be the Keeper of the Heads
    • He impaled new heads and threw the old ones in the river
  • At one time, 30 heads were counted on the bridge
  • In 1678 the heads were moved to Temple Bar instead
  • Modern-day, there is still a spike on London bridge
    • Could be a sun-dial; could be a reminder of the bloody history of the bridge 
    • Supposedly is just a marker to point to where the original London Bridge crossed the river


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References

https://paul-81502.medium.com/the-severed-heads-of-london-bridge-6b4b6be678f4

https://www.londonremembers.com/subjects/london-bridge-head-spikes

https://londonist.com/2016/05/what-s-the-spike-on-london-bridge-for

The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Twenty-Nine – Vocabulary

Our vocab word for The Prince and the Pauper Chapter 29 doesn’t get used very much anymore. But occasionally it will still come up in modern texts! The vocab word is…

BY-AND-BY

Keep reading or watch the video below see how the word ‘by-and-by’ is used in The Prince and the Pauper.

BY-AND-BY

DEFINITION

(n) a future time or occasion
FACTS/CHARACTERISTICS

Can also be an adverb
EXAMPLES

future
before long
soon
NON-EXAMPLES

yesterday
right now

History

  • by and by (early 14c.) originally meant “one by one,” with by apparently denoting succession; modern sense of “before long” is from 1520s.

Sentences/Additional Forms

  • Straightforward sentence: By-and-by, we’ll take a trip to Europe.
  • Sentence from the chapter: “By-and-by a thought occurred to him which pointed to a possibility…” (p. 175)
  • Other forms: n/a

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References

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/by-and-by#:~:text=(Entry%201%20of%202),adverb

https://www.tradeready.ca/2017/topics/import-export-trade-management/developing-vision-future-international-business/

NEW PRODUCT: The Prince and the Pauper – Pontes Books White Version Audiobook Now Available

Whether you enjoy listening to audiobooks while following along in the actual book or listening to audiobooks exclusively while doing activities like driving or walking, you might be excited about our new product!

There is now an audiobook version available for the Pontes Books White Version of The Prince and the Pauper!

Where can you find the audiobook?

You can find the audiobook in two places: Audible and Amazon (though both technically are through Audible).

Click here to view book on Audible

Click here to view book on Amazon

If you have any questions, contact us at admin@pontesbooks.com.

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The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Twenty-Eight – Fun Fact

Have you ever been in a crowd and it suddenly went silent? Have you ever been a part of a moment of silence? Whether it’s planned or not, the idea of an entire crowd going and remaining silent is always an impressive feat. Today’s Fun Fact for The Prince and the Pauper Chapter 28 focuses on…

CROWDS GOING SILENT

Keep reading or watch the video below for more information.

Reference in The Prince and the Pauper

“A faint tinge appeared for a moment in the lady’s cheek, and she dropped her eyes “Hendon made no outcry under the scourge, but bore the heavy blows with soldierly fortitude. This, together with his redeeming the boy by taking his stripes for him, compelled the respect of even that forlorn and degraded mob that was gathered there; and its gibes and hootings died away, and no sound remained but the sound of the falling blows. The stillness that pervaded the place, when Hendon found himself once more in the stocks, was in strong contrast with the insulting clamour which had prevailed there so little a while before.” (p. 173)

A Moment of Silence

Typically, a planned moment of silence is a gesture to show respect, often for someone who has passed away, or often for a tragedy where many people die. Often times they can be 60 seconds long, but really can be any length of time.

The first recorded official moment of silence for someone who died took place in Portugal on February 13, 1912. The moment was for José Maria da Silva Paranhos Júnior, the baron of Rio Branco, Brazil. It was for ten minutes. The same year many places held a moment of silence for the Titanic and Maine shipwrecks.

Detecting Lies

So what about those silences that are unplanned? Often times these are referred to as an awkward silence, dead air, or a pregnant pause. Most people have experienced these at some point in their life. Some people claim that these silences often happen exactly 20 minutes after the hour (6:20, 2:20, etc.)

There are two different types of susperstitious reasons people claim as the reason for why this happens. The first is that some people believe that angels are singing, and the all humans subconsciously get silent when that is happening. Another susperstitious explanation is that since Abraham Lincoln died at 7:20, people naturally continue to observe a silence at 20 minutes after the hour. However, both of these explanations don’t have anything to support them.

There is also a more scientific explanation, though this one doesn’t really relate to the 20 minutes idea. Some people claim that our human instincts mostly revolve around silence. When we grow silent as a group, our instincts are kicking in to ensure there is no danger nearby. Once we are sure there is no threat, we continue with our conversations.

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References

https://science.howstuffworks.com/science-vs-myth/everyday-myths/hush-crowded-room.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_of_silence

https://www.stockunlimited.com/image/crowd-gesturing-silence_1883498.html

The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Twenty-Eight – Historical Tidbit

Our Historical Tidbit for today focuses on yet another moment in The Prince and the Pauper where Mark Twain throws out a reference and does not include any context whatsoever. Today’s Historical Tidbit is about…

KING HENRY II BEING WHIPPED

Keep reading or watch the video below to learn more.

Edward finds out that he was going to be whipped for speaking out on Miles’s behalf. The paragraph excerpt below breaks down what is going through his mind in that moment.

“The King was seized.  He did not even struggle, so paralysed was he with the mere thought of the monstrous outrage that was proposed to be inflicted upon his sacred person.  History was already defiled with the record of the scourging of an English king with whips—it was an intolerable reflection that he must furnish a duplicate of that shameful page.”  (p. 172)

So who was the king who was whipped in the past? King Henry II

Who was Henry II?

  • Great grandson of William the Conqueror
  • Father of Richard the Lionheart and King John
  • Duke of Normandy by age 18
  • Became king at age 21
  • Had many disputes with King Louis VII of France
    • Including marrying his ex-wife
  • Massively reconstructed royal government 
  • Changed the relationship between the church and monarchy
  • Makes Thomas Becket (his chancellor) the Archbishop of Canterbury
  • The two often quarreled

Why was he whipped?

  • Henry supposedly said “someone rid me of this turbulent priest” about Becket
  • Four knights misinterpreted his words and murdered Becket
  • The pope blamed the King for Becket’s death
  • As penance for his sin, he was whipped by every Monk


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References

https://www.fromoldbooks.org/Burton-WonderfulProdigies/pages/p112-King-henry-Whipped/230×200-q75.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Becket_controversy

https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofEngland/King-Henry-II-of-England/

The Prince and the Pauper – Chapter Twenty-Eight – Vocabulary

Our vocab word for The Prince and the Pauper Chapter 28 focuses on a commonly-used word. It typically evokes a particular image in people’s minds. The vocab word is…

MOB

Keep reading or watch the video below see how the word ‘mob’ is used in The Prince and the Pauper.

MOB

DEFINITION

(n.) a large and disorderly crowd of people
FACTS/CHARACTERISTICS

often bent on riotous or destructive action
EXAMPLES

crowd
flock
throng
NON-EXAMPLES

solitude
hermit

Etymology

  • Language of Origin: Latin
  • Mobile vulgus = “vacillating crowd”

Sentences/Additional Forms

  • Straightforward sentence: After leaving the basketball game, I lost my friend in the mob outside the arena.
  • Sentence from the chapter: “There sat his poor henchman in the degrading stocks, the sport and butt of a dirty mob…” (p. 171)
  • Other forms: mob (v.), mobbish (adj.)

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References

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mob#synonyms

https://www.istockphoto.com/illustrations/angry-crowd